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Cat Health News Blog

A resource for dedicated cat supporters

Since its start in 2007, Cat Health News has featured the latest information on feline health. The bi-weekly blog is a mix of the most current published research from Winn-funded research and other sources. There are over 570 blog items and more than 1,000 subscribers through the RSS feed.

icon-blogWinn-funded research is specifically noted by the small green cat.

  • Sponsor research on a potential new treatment type for FIP

    Oct 09, 2015

    Winn is seeking donations of $250 and up to sponsor specific projects from the 2015 Winn grant review. Sponsors will receive progress reports as they are available and copies of any publications that result from the project that are provided by the investigators. Your help in sponsoring these projects means Winn can fund even more research next year.

    One project will help cats through research through evaluating a new potential type of therapy for cats with FIP. Sponsorship is easy!

    View other honored donors who have sponsored other research projects.

    W15-030:  Using small interfering RNA for treatment of feline infectious peritonitis. $16,500
    Principal Investigators: Emin Anis, PhD; Rebecca Wilkes, DVM, PhD; The University of Georgia

    kitten-w-effusive-FIP-webFeline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease that is caused by feline coronavirus (FCoV). Cats lack an effective immune response (IR) to the virus and cats with FIP have a profound reduction in a specific white blood cell type (WBCs) that is important for protection of cats from infection. In this study, it is proposed that death of these important WBCs is due to activation of a response called “programmed death” within the cells. Initiation of this response is thought to be due to an overexpression of two proteins on the surface of the WBCs and the interaction of these two proteins. Preliminary evidence supports this hypothesis therefore the study’s goals are to confirm these findings by testing more samples and to evaluate whether blocking WBCs death will enhance the survival of the white blood cells. If shown to be effective, programmed death pathway blocking could be a useful addition to any therapy that specifically targets the virus.


    FIP feline infectious peritonitis siRNAs

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