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Response to Vaccinations in Cats

Mar 16, 2009
Lappin, M. R., J. Veir, et al. (2009). "Feline panleukopenia virus, feline herpesvirus-1, and feline calicivirus antibody responses in seronegative specific pathogen-free cats after a single administration of two different modified live FVRCP vaccines." Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery 11(2): 159-162.

Researchers at Colorado State University evaluated the antibody response of cats to a single inoculation of one of two modified live vaccines containing feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), feline herpesvirus (FHV) and feline calicivirus (FCV). These pathogens commonly infect cats, and some cats at greatest risk, such as those in shelters or pet stores, may suffer severe disease, or even death. In these situations, rapid onset of immunity following vaccination is needed. The investigators sought to determine the timing of seroconversion in 10 seronegative cats following a single vaccination with either an intranasal vaccine or one given subcutaneously (both are commercially available vaccines). This study had limitations, in that the number of cats tested were small, and protection was evaluated by antibody levels only. In addition, the cats tested were adults not kittens; thus, the ability to break through maternal immunity could not be evaluated. Nevertheless, results were informative. While all cats developed detectable FPV and FCV antibody titers; only two cats developed detectable FHV-1 antibody titers indicating two vaccinations are required for adequate protection. For FPV and FHV-1, there were no differences in seroconversion rates between the cats that were given the intranasal versus the injectable vaccine. However, for FCV, the cats that were administered the IN FVRCP vaccine were more likely to seroconvert earlier than cats that were administered the injectable vaccine. These results suggest that the FVRCP vaccine administered IN should be considered in populations of FCV naive cats with high risk of exposure. [MK]
>> PubMed Abstract

Related articles:
Lappin, M. R., R. W. Sebring, et al. (2006). "Effects of a single dose of an intranasal feline herpesvirus 1, calicivirus, and panleukopenia vaccine on clinical signs and virus shedding after challenge with virulent feline herpesvirus 1." J Feline Med Surg 8(3): 158-63.
>> PubMed Abstract

Lappin, M. R., J. Andrews, et al. (2002). "Use of serologic tests to predict resistance to feline herpesvirus 1, feline calicivirus, and feline parvovirus infection in cats." J Am Vet Med Assoc 220(1): 38-42.
>> PubMed Abstract
antibody titer panleukopenia vaccination feline herpesvirus calicivirus

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