Dedicated to the
Health and Welfare of All Cats
A A A
Font Size
hero-education

Cat Health News Blog

A resource for dedicated cat supporters

Since its start in 2007, Cat Health News has featured the latest information on feline health. The bi-weekly blog is a mix of the most current published research from Winn-funded research and other sources. There are over 875 blog post items and more than 1,000 subscribers through the RSS feed.


icon-blogWinn-funded research is specifically noted by the small green cat.

  • Comparing the European wildcat and the domestic cat

    Dec 12, 2017
    Berteselli GV, Regaiolli B, Normando S, et al. European wildcat and domestic cat: Do they really differ? J Vet Behav. Nov-Dec 2017; Vol 22, p35-40.

    The wildcat (Felis silvestris) is considered a “strictly protected” species.European wildcat Nevertheless, it is classed as threatened in many European countries. Improving our knowledge on the behavior of the European wildcat might be valuable for the conservation of this species in the wild as well as for its husbandry in captive environment.

    The aim of this study was to enhance biological and behavioral knowledge of the European wildcat by comparing its behavior with that of the domestic cat. Individual and social behaviors of a group of European wildcats in captivity were observed and compared with behaviors of a domestic cats' group to underline similarities and differences.

    Six European wildcats housed at Parco Natura Viva and 5 domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus) were the subjects of this study. Two 10-minute daily sessions per subject were run. For each subject, a total of 120 minutes of observational data were collected. Individual and social behaviors of the 2 groups were recorded. A continuous focal animal sampling method was used to assess the amount of time spent in all behaviors.

    Results of this study underline that both captive wildcats and domestic cats showed species-specific behaviors. However, captive wildcats performed more “not observed,” “vigilance,” and “scent marking” than domestic cats, whereas domestic cats performed more “individual sleeping” than captive wildcats.

    In conclusion, findings of this study seem to suggest that behavioral differences between European wildcat and domestic cat are less common than are their similarities. However, further research on the behavior of wildcats is needed to improve the ex situ and in situ conservation of this species.

    See also:
    Oliveira R, Randi E, Mattucci F, et al. Toward a genome-wide approach for detecting hybrids: informative SNPs to detect introgression between domestic cats and European wildcats (Felis silvestris). Heredity (Edinb).2015 Sep;115(3):195-205.

    European wildcat domestic cat house cat behavior species-specific

    More on cat health:

    Winn Feline Foundation Library
    Find us on Facebook
    Follow us on Twitter
    Pin with us on Pinterest
    Join us on Google+

 

Archives

2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007